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A Systems Look at Strategies for Physician Burnout

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In continuing to look at physician burnout and ways to combat the problem, here’s a recent article from Harvard Business Review that takes a look at some strategies Southern California Permanente Medical Group is using to support their physicians.

Physician burnout is a growing problem for all health care systems in the United States. Burned-out physicians deliver lower quality care, reduce their hours, or stop practicing, reducing access to care around the country. Primary care physicians are particularly vulnerable: They have some of the highest burnout rates of any medical discipline.

As part of our work researching high-performing primary care systems, we discovered a system-wide approach launched by Southern California Permanente Medical Group (SCPMG) in 2004 that unburdens primary care physicians. We believe the program — Complete Care — may be a viable model for other institutions looking to decrease burnout or increase physician satisfaction. (While burnout can easily be measured, institutions often don’t publicly report their own rates and the associated turnover they experience. Consequently, we used physician satisfaction as a proxy for burnout in our research.)

In most health care systems, primary care physicians are the first stop for patients needing care. As a result, their patients’ needs — and their own tasks — vary immensely. A primary care physician’s work includes vaccinations, screenings, chronic disease prevention and treatment, relationship building, family planning, behavioral health, counseling, and other vital but time-consuming work.

Some studies have examined just how much time a primary care physician needs to do all of these tasks and the results are staggering. To be in full compliance with the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendations, primary care physicians with average-sized patient populations need to dedicate 7.4 hours per day to preventative care alone. Taken in conjunction with the other primary care services, namely acute and chronic care, the estimated total working hours per primary care physician comes to 21.7 hours per day, or 108.5 hours per week. Given such workloads, the high burnout rate is hardly surprising.

While designed with the intent to improve quality of care, SCPMG’s Complete Care program also alleviates some of the identified drivers of physician burnout by following a systematic approach to care delivery. Comprised of 8,500 physicians, SCPMG consistently provides the highest quality care to the region’s 4.4 million plan members. And a recent study of SCPMG physician satisfaction suggests that regardless of discipline, physicians feel high levels of satisfaction in three key areas: their compensation, their perceived ability to deliver high-quality care, and their day-to-day professional lives.

At LACMA, it’s important to us to share resources on this important topic. We’re also addressing it at the Saving Private Practice Consortium on July 15th. Please join us! You can see the full agenda or register here.

You’ll find the full article detailing the Complete Care program at Harvard Business Review.

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